No products in the cart.
 

Fremont River Guides

Utah National Parks Adventure Tour Company!

Archives

Capitol Reef National Park Fly Fishing Guides

FremontVelvetPanarama

Fly Fishing Southern Utah’s Fremont River is the crown jewel of less traveled trophy waters which meander through awe inspiring red bluffs near the Capitol Reef National Park. The mountains meet the high desert of South Central Utah’s color country forming perfect habitat and world class fly fishing for Brown, Rainbow, Cutthroat, Brook and Tiger Trout. The best way to experience this is to hire a guide or stop by the fly shop for advice, maps, flies and direction!

Perhaps the most rewarding dry fly fishing you will ever encounter, the Fremont River is a surreal experience that at many levels will teach you more about fly fishing than you ever thought possible. There are times that the combination of crystal clear slow moving water and lush riparian zones, set against the stark contrast of the red rocks and many national parks, the Fremont River can pierce your soul.

Options for fly fishing the Capitol Reef National Park area are best planned using Torrey as a base. Our fly shop is located on main street where most restaurants, galleries and other services are found as well. Options for fishing include; Fremont River, Boulder Mountains and Thousand Lakes Mountain. Guides are a valuable resource due to the vast nature of these remote canyons, mountains and valleys.

Our guides can pick up guests up at their specific lodging facility for a day on the water and bring lunch, rentals gear, flies, terminal tackle and everything else needed for a trip you won’t soon forget! 

Please check out our local resources link for detailed information about the area and for trip planning ideas.

You may also call us directly for information about purchasing a packaged fly fishing excursion.

The upper most section below Johnson Valley Reservoir flows downstream through over 7 miles of forest service land before entering Mill Meadow Reservoir. We consider this section the “Upper Fremont”. This water has some long stretches which are overgrown with fallen branches, pine trees and sagebrush, but this section holds superb undercuts with large trout. From Capitol Reef National Park or Torrey town just outside the park boundaries, a 30 minute drive will get you to these waters.

We call the section of the river below Mill Meadow Reservoir the “Middle Fremont” which holds brown, rainbow and splake. The river will wind its way through the Fremont Valley passing the towns of Fremont, Loa and then Lyman picking up some spring water flow along its journey. There is some public access, but most of the water passes through private property. Certain sections can produce good numbers of fish here and even some larger trophy sized trout. Be prepared to travel down many county dirt roads if you want to fish the middle river as you can lose it quickly in the plethora of fields, canyons and private property. This is the least fishable region of the river.

Downriver from the small town of Bicknell are the north slope of the Boulder Mountains to the south and Thousand Lakes Mountain to the north. This section we refer to as the “Lower Fremont”. It is a very scenic section with many red rock bluffs as well as farmland as it passes the town of Torrey and only 5 minutes from park boundaries.

There are at least 20 miles of river here before it enters Capitol Reef National Park. Trout are only supported in the river until a few miles before it reaches the park. The lower river is almost completely private land with very little public access fishing. Most of the trout caught in this section are browns with a good population of rainbows and even an outside chance at a tiger or cutthroat if you’re lucky. The majority of this private water can be accessed through Fremont River Guides by hiring a guide or paying a rod fee for non-guided fly-fishing only.

The rewards are great here if you are willing to make the trek! Hatches are good during the spring, summer and fall. Midges, Baetis, Olive Stoneflies, Golden Stones, Tricos as well as numerous other mayfly, stonefly and caddis hatches. Don’t shy away from streamers as they tend to bring the bigger trout to the net. Whether you prefer using a dry-dropper technique or nymph with strike indicator, all will produce if presented properly.

Towering over Capitol Reef are the high elevations of the Boulder Mountains Aquarius Plateau. Home to numerous quality streams and over 50 fishable lakes, the Boulders afford anglers plenty of options to explore. And the rewards are great with monster brook trout, large cruising cutthroat and veracious Tiger Trout!

Fishing these waters will mostly require a 4×4 vehicle to travel the rough roads and to get to the trailheads. The majority of lakes are short hikes from 1-2 miles. Others can require 3-4 miles of hiking or more and a good map. Areas to become familiar with are; north slope, south slope, west slope and the Griffin Top. Some of these waters are impoundments to previous natural lakes, larger reservoirs and also numerous natural lakes mostly smaller in size.

Come prepared with both floating and sinking lines as different water types may require both for the best presentations. Due to the volcanic activity of the past, Boulder Mountain Lakes produce wonderful hatches of every kind. Midges should be the main course through spring into late June when Callibaetis are prevalent across many of these still-waters. Evening Caddis Emergence are a regular occurrence and worth the time if you backpack and spend the night camping. Leeches, scuds, damselflies and dragonflies are not to be forgotten either.

This less known mountain has far fewer lakes than its close neighbor the Boulder Mountains to the south.  These lakes can be accessed by atv/utv from Torrey by national forest routes through Sulphur Basin. These lakes are found just below the plateau which tops all the local mountains of the area.

Beautiful vantage points from atop 1000 Lakes Mountain of Upper Cathedral Valley will blow your mind! Bring a camera for the scenery and big brook trout found here. Rainbows, Tiger Trout and Cutthroat will give anglers a reason to stay awhile and explore. Hatches and tactics are similar to those of the Boulder Mountain.

Fremont River

ourwaters-fremontsliderpan

Fly Fishing Southern Utah’s Fremont River is the crown jewel of less traveled trophy waters which meander through awe inspiring red bluffs near the Capitol Reef National Park.The mountains meet the high desert of South Central Utah’s color country forming perfect habitat and world class fly fishing for Brown, Rainbow, Cutthroat, Brook and Tiger Trout. The best way to experience this is to hire a guide!

Perhaps the most rewarding dry fly fishing you will ever encounter, the Fremont River is a surreal experience that at many levels will teach you more about fly fishing than you ever thought possible. There are times that the combination of crystal clear slow moving water and lush riparian zones, set against the stark contrast of the red rocks and many national parks, the Fremont River can pierce your soul.

The Fremont River flows through the town of Torrey where we recommend our clients stay for the best fly fishing access with our guides.

Also, the best lodging and restaurants are available in Torrey as well.

Our guides will pick guests up at their lodging facility for the day on the water which is very close if you are fishing the Fremont River or Boulder Mountains.

Please check out our local resources link for detailed information about the area and for trip planning ideas.

You may also call us directly for information about purchasing a packaged fly fishing excursion.

The upper most section below Johnson Valley Reservoir flows downstream through over 7 miles of forest service land before entering Mill Meadow Reservoir. We consider this section the “Upper Fremont”. This water has some long stretches which are overgrown with fallen branches, pine trees and sagebrush, but this section holds superb undercuts with large trout.

The first 4 miles below the dam are virtually never fished and very remote. Anglers should explore this water with a well equipped day pack and plan for plenty of bush-wacking. Stretches of beautiful open water can be found with bruiser brown trout and no fishing pressure to speak of.

The rewards are great here if you are willing to make the trek! Hatches are good during the spring, summer and fall. Midges, Baetis, Olive Stoneflies, Golden Stones, Tricos as well as numerous other mayfly, stonefly and caddis hatches. Don’t shy away from streamers as they tend to bring the bigger trout to the net. Whether you prefer using a dry-dropper technique or nymph with strike indicator, all will produce if presented properly.

We call the section of the river below Mill Meadow Reservoir the “Middle Fremont” which holds brown, rainbow and splake. The river will wind its way through the Fremont Valley passing the towns of Fremont, Loa and then Lyman picking up some spring water flow along its journey. There is some public access, but most of the water passes through private property.

Certain sections can produce good numbers of fish here and even some larger trophy sized trout. Be prepared to travel down many county dirt roads if you want to fish the middle river as you can lose it quickly in the plethora of fields, canyons and private property. Hatches are similar to the upper stretches, but great terrestrial fishing can be had here as well. Hoppers, ants, beetles and damsel dries to name a few.

This section downriver from the small town of Bicknell is bordered by the lower slopes of the Boulder Mountains to the south and Thousand Lakes Mountain to the north. This is also very scenic with many red rock bluffs as well as farmland as it passes the town of Torrey.

There are at least 20 miles of river here before it enters Capitol Reef National Park. Trout are only supported in the river until a few miles before it reaches the park. The lower river is almost completely private land with very little public access fishing. Most of the trout caught in this section are browns with a good population of rainbows and even an outside chance at a tiger or cutthroat if you’re lucky.

Hatches here include; midges, baetis, PMD’s, callibaetis, a myriad of caddisflies, yellow sallies, golden stones, salmonflies, terrestrials and others. Anglers will find the trout consistently rising to strong hatches of aquatic insects throughout the season. Fly fishers will quickly see what makes the Fremont River, the Boulder Mountains, Fishlake Mountain, Thousand Lakes Mountain and other neighboring streams and lakes so esteemed.

Our guides can help you unlock the secrets of the area and teach you the necessary skills to succeed. Any fly angler that is able to learn the basics of fishing these waters will suddenly find that all other places become easier and more enjoyable to fish.

Boulder Mountains

BrookieClosepan

The famous Boulder Mountains make up half of the Aquarius Plateau of South Central Utah in Wayne and Garfield counties. The mountain rises to the west of Capitol Reef National Park and consists of steep slopes and cliffs with over 50,000 acres of rolling forest and meadow-lands on the top. It is the highest timbered plateau in North America and is part of the Dixie National Forest. More importantly, there are over 50 fishable lakes depending on what mother nature offers from year to year.

Utah Scenic Byway 12 traverses the eastern side of the mountain from Torrey through Boulder and on to Escalante. Highway 24 which passes on the north side of the Boulder Mountains through Loa and Bicknell also offers access to the lakes, streams and high country.

A series of unpaved back-country roads, jeep trails, hiking trails and ATV trails provide access to most of the mountain during the brief snow free time, which is usually only a few months from June to September.

Snow and hail storms are common on Utah’s Boulder Mountain even during the mid summer months when the monsoon season sweeps through the area.

Our Boulder Mountains fly fishing guides will help you learn the vast and remote lakes of this beautiful area. And guides will pick up their clients in the towns of Torrey, Boulder or Escalante for departure.

The Aquarius Plateau, an uplift on the much larger Colorado Plateau, is the highest in North America. It is over 900 square miles of mostly forested highland, of which is part of Dixie National Forest. The plateau includes Boulder Mountain which peaks at 11,328 feet at Bluebell Knoll and has over 50,000 acres of rolling hilly terrain above 11,000 feet.

Views from atop the Plateau are majestic and diverse.  Some vantage points will uncover canyons and desert basins as bordering the Aquarius are the Escalante Grand Staircase National Monument and Capitol Reef National Park.  A short 30 minute drive from the base of the mountains will afford travelers entrance to these less traveled parks.  Give plenty of time to explore and you’ll leave with a new outlook on this corner of southern Utah.  And you’ll likely feel better as the clear mountain air which is far from metropolitan areas will clear the mind and invigorate the soul.

For years we have been offering guided fly fishing trips on the Boulder Mountain and as an outfitter you can be confident that we know the remote lakes well. Though many anglers have found out about these waters, they remain remote and more difficult than most “tender-footers” are willing to venture the effort required to fish them. If you are looking for a trip of a lifetime, fly fishing the Boulder Mountains for monster brook trout, cutthroat (Bonneville, Colorado River, Yellowstone), browns, rainbows, tiger, splake and grayling will not disappoint.

Anglers will need to hire a guide to find most of the quality lakes and streams unless you have a lot of time to explore. And these wild trout will test even the stiffest of graphite rods to their maximum.  This is not a mountain to find yourself unprepared.  Flies of every kind can be found from Damsels and Dragonflies to Midges and Caddis.  But freshwater shrimp are why trout grow to gargantuan proportions.  In fact, state record size Brook Trout normally carry similar measurements from length compared to girth.

Fremont River Guides will take you by 4×4 and UTV’s to get nearer our preferred lakes with some requiring a hike from a half mile to 2 miles.  Others will require a longer trek if anglers have the ability and it is always worth the effort.  All Boulder Mountain Fly Fishing trips require a full day guide fee.  And use of all terrain vehicles for certain waters will be reflective in your charges.

Fly fishing the Boulder Mountains begins in early May when the high elevation snow melts and roads become somewhat accessible.  Most years the lower lakes are fishable by early May and the higher still-waters near the end of the month. The Boulder Creek, Pine Creek, North Creek and others will rise from high altitude snow pack in late May or early June and usually drop and clear quickly.  By June, the snow is all but gone and the wild trout are already feeding heavily in order to take advantage of the short growing season in this high country where most of the good lakes are above 9,000 feet.

Spring conditions will invite colorful Cutthroat to the shallows where site fishing can be productive and visually astounding.  It is not uncommon for guides to land over 50 fish in a day with a couple anglers if you find the right locations.  Timing is a must and the window is short…so commit to booking a guide and you’ll have a day you won’t soon forget.

Early summer brings some prolific midge hatches, occasionally so thick you can hardly fish or breathe.  And every fish will seemingly be cruising the shallows gulping dries from the surface.  Mid-summer hatches make for the best fishing as water levels begin to fall and clarity in lakes is like crystal.  Calm days fly fishing on the Boulder Mountain are unpredictable, but if you are lucky enough to get one you’ll never forget it.  More difficult fish become vulnerable when hatches are allowed to erupt into a perfect storm of bugs.

It would be a mistake to forget the fall season on many of the natural lakes of the Boulders.  As oak brush, choke cherry and Aspen change color, so do the Brook Trout.  Monsters can be had this time of year and timing is everything.  Do not find yourself under gunned.  Rods in the 6-8 weight class are a must for the big boys and anything less is just begging to be shattered into pieces.

These are some of the biggest wild brook trout found anywhere in the country. Yes, anywhere! Did you know the Utah state record brook trout is over 7.5 pounds? That’s right…and there are plenty of fish which surpass this record on the mountain today. Four to five pound fish are common and fish much larger than this can be found in some of the lakes. You will need a guide to find them or a good GPS, hiking boots and a lot of years spent on the trail.

Everyone knows that fishing new waters is fun, but it can sometimes be frustrating to find the best of what the area has to offer.  This is especially true in southern Utah fly fishing the Boulder Mountains for big brookies.  The spawners like specific areas made perfect for this purpose.  And a good guide will know exactly where to find them without wasting valuable time.  Don’t hesitate another year to book an experienced guide.  Then you will know why everyone is saying that fly fishing the Boulder Mountains is one of the last best fisheries for trout like grandpa used to catch.

Many days fishing are a prerequisite to learning which of the over 50 lakes hold big trout.  Some are fun to fish and you could expect to catch good numbers of 8-12 inch stunted Brookies.  Hiring a guide will pay-off for those limited on time and wishing to land monster Brook Trout, Tiger Trout or Cutthroat Trout.

Our professionals are on the water every day and live the lifestyle of a true fly fishing guide.  We eat and sleep to know trout habits and you can expect our Boulder Mountain guides to get you into fish while having a ton of fun doing it.  And we will work hard to meet you expectations for a good day whether that be catching a lot of fish or targeting bigger ones.

Boulder Mountain Streams

Scenic Fremont River

A multitude of wild trout streams drain the Boulder Mountains of southern Utah. This is a photographers paradise, with cover shots around every bend and beautiful pools and runs which hold hefty sized brown, rainbow and cutthroat trout.  Sandstone cliffs which slope steeply into the rivers edge will form pools few anglers will every see in their lifetime. These small stream waters are truly unique to anywhere in the world and we feel fortunate that fly fishing the Boulder Mountains of Utah is considered to be our home waters.

Many of these creeks have some access which can be reached by hiking, but the further you go the better they will fish. Of course, you will get away from other anglers but there is little pressure to avoid in any case.  Most Boulder Mountain streams will require you to bring a day pack with some water, snacks, a rain jacket and you should be somewhat nimble on your feet.  After all, this is called the “Boulder” mountain.

Don’t expect to find any big rivers here as these waters average 15 to 20 feet wide or less.  There are plenty of stretches with wide pools and runs much bigger than this, but for the most part a shorter rod and a lighter line performs better here.  We prefer a 3 weight rod between 7 and 8.5 feet long for accuracy and delicate presentations. There are some fish that will put a light rod to the test, but generally they can be handled well with 2 to 4 weight graphite rods. These wild trout are also more spooky than picky, so…bring plenty of lightweight equipment and your 5x tippets will be plenty fine for these under-fished waters.

Bryce Canyon National Park Fly Fishing Guides

ourwaters-brycesliderpan

Numerous fly fishing opportunities can be had in the Bryce Canyon National Park area. Bryce Canyon guided fly fishing trips will not be soon forgotten as there are many small streams and lakes near some of the most impressive scenery in the world. One minute you are looking at the mystical hoodoos and the next a 20 inch brown trout taken on a dry fly.

Whether you are a fly fishing neophyte or experienced angler, you will not be disappointed as we have prolific hatches as well as large trout. Driving east from the park to the Boulder Mountains affords us numerous still-waters and streams. State record Brook Trout can be had on high mountain lakes above 9,000 feet. A hybrid trout called the “Tiger” are commonly caught in the 20-25 inch class on the Boulder Mountains along with Splake (Lake Trout/Brook Trout hybrid) Bonneville Cutthroat, Yellowstone Cutthroat, Colorado River Cutthroat, Rainbows and Browns. Just 30 minutes to the west of the park are several blue ribbon streams with quality sized wild trout commonly between 12-18 inches.

Just minutes from the park, our Bryce Canyon fly fishing guides will get you on the water for a memorable angling experience.

Prolific hatches occur on these local streams and lakes which will satisfy even the most avid fly-fisher. And if you are a beginner, Fremont River Guides has a staff of professionals who can teach basic fly casting techniques as well as entomology (aquatic bug life).

After a great hike, horseback ride or ATV tour, let one of our experienced southern Utah fly fishing guides treat you to a peaceful day on the water.

Guides will pick you up at your lodging facility with all the equipment needed as well as food and beverages.

So…don’t hesitate to call and book a Bryce Canyon National Park area fly fishing guide.

Fly Fishing Guide Trip Rates

RENDEZVOUS WITH YOUR GUIDE AT THESE LOCATIONS

  • Torrey & Loa (near Capitol Reef Nat’l Park) & Fishlake
  • Boulder Town (near Escalante Grand Staircase & Burr Trail)
  • Bryce Canyon City & Escalante (near Bryce Canyon Nat’l Park)
  • Panguitch, Hatch, Mt. Carmel Junction & Duck Creek Village
  • Springdale (near Zions Nat’l Park)

Zion National Park Fly Fishing Guides

ourwaters-zionsliderpan

Near Zion National Park there are two distinct fly fishing options; higher elevation (above 5,500 ft.)streams and lakes to the northeast of the park for wild trout as well as high desert bass fishing to the west. Either direction, Fremont River Guides will get you on the water and away from crowds where you are in your element. Fly fishing seasons on these local waters is possible from March until it tapers off around late November. The prime fishing is from April to late October.

Whether you are a neophyte or fly fishing addict, our guides will put you in the middle of prolific hatches and rising trout. Or aggressive Large Mouth Bass on top water poppers if that is your preference. And there are numerous options, especially for those with a full day and time to venture off the beaten path.

A good option during the late spring is to drive about 45 minutes where we will find rising trout on an evening Caddis emergence.

Another scenario is casting to cruisers from our stealth boats in one of our private lakes. And fly fishing Kolob Reservoir is fantastic from a float tube and our closest option for wild trout at just 20 minutes from Springdale. Rainbows will cruise shallows in the spring time during the spawn and they can be very vulnerable to bright flies and the correct presentation. Mid summer and fall offer some of the best fly fishing of the year with gray drake spinner falls into the night…but a guide is absolutely essential as specific waters fish exponentially better if you can find them.

Our Zion National Park fly fishing guides will pick you up near the west entrance at Flanigan’s Inn or near the east entrance at Zion Mountain Ranch as well as other facilities if need be. Whatever the need, Fremont River Guides will make it happen so that you can enjoy some great fly fishing while visiting this incredible national park. Plan ahead if possible and give us a call to discuss the options for your next excursion.

PRIVATE LAKES AND STREAMS – Fremont River Guides has exclusive access on multiple private lakes and neighboring streams near Zion National Park. Guided trips and rod fees allow for access to these scenic waters where you will find large wild trout! Some are further than others when traveling away from ZNP for the day, so call ahead of time for information or to schedule an excursion.

Brian Head & Duck Creek

YD4Y0066-Wild Brown

Scenic highway 14 passing through Duck Creek Village and continuing to Cedar Breaks National Monument is a location you don’t want to miss! Forty gorgeous miles across the southern section of the Markagunt Plateau, east from Cedar City, to where it joins with Highway 89. This forested portion of land is governed by the Forest Service and open to many activities. Upon reaching the top of the plateau you will be at 11,000 ft. elevation. There are several scenic view points that look down into Zion National Park or out among the towering pine forest. Navajo Lake is picture perfect with the small lake framed by aspens and pines. The lake is interesting in that all water from the lake drains though sinkholes in the limestone beneath it.

Duck Creek, found along-side Highway 14, is a wonderful fly fishing stream with wild brookies and some nicer brown trout. There are many fishing ponds stocked with trout on Cedar Mountain, including Navajo Lake, Panguitch Lake, Duck Pond, Mammoth Creek, and Aspen Mirror Lake. The elevations on Cedar Mountain range from 8,500 ft. to 11,000 ft. perfect for cooler temperatures and wonderful fishing.

If you are looking for a fly fishing guide in southern Utah to show you how to find some of the more hidden gems of the Duck Creek and Brian Head area, then give Fremont River Guides a call. Our guides are experienced and flexible so that we can cater to anglers and their schedule when visiting this wonderful area.

Our Brian Head and Duck Creek Village fly fishing guides for southern Utah will pick you up at your lodging facility and can provide any equipment needed. Call as soon as you know the dates you will be in the area as our guides book up well in advance!
Guide Rates & Rod Fees

Call us for information about fishing private waters near Brian Head and Duck Creek Village with a guide only. There are some exclusive options which you don’t want to miss!

Escalante & Boulder

Backpacking the Boulder Mountains

Scenic highway 12 passing through Escalante and Boulder is being considered by many as the most impressive drive in the world bar none! You can only imagine what the streams flowing through these canyons must be like. Remote in some areas, but in others, very accessible if you know where to go. It is highly recommended that first time fly-fishers to this area hire a guide due to vast wilderness areas, canyons and some private land.

By hiking the Escalante River canyon, there are trails to wonderful feeder streams with great hatches and wild trout. Those expecting only to see trout in the 8-10 inch range will be surprised. Do not be fooled as large browns and rainbows inhabit various stream waters in this area which can reach 20 inches in length or more. Adventurous anglers who enjoy backpacking will find themselves fly fishing in the best waters near Boulder and Escalante by spending a few nights under the stars.

Several quality streams near the towns of Escalante and Boulder require some hiking due to mostly remote access. And a knowledgeable fly fishing guide is worth every penny to get you around private land and on the most productive sections. North Creek, Calf Creek and Boulder Creek share prolific hatches of mayflies, caddisflies, midges, stoneflies and terrestrials as well. Dry fly fishing is superb! You will want to bring a shorter rod with some backbone for the larger fish that inhabit the undercuts and deep pools.

Hiking these canyons can be dangerous! It is highly recommended to hire a guide knowledgeable about the trails and weather patterns. The scenery of these canyons and spring creeks inspire all who venture off the beaten path.

Call us for information about fishing private waters near Boulder with a guide only. There are some exclusive options which you don’t want to miss!

Panguitch Lake Area

Panguitch Lake was originally a large natural lake that has been dammed to become a reservoir of over 1,200 acres. The lake is located on the Markagunt Plateau, between Panguitch, Utah and Cedar Breaks National Monument. Brian Head-Panguitch Lake Scenic Byway or Utah’s Patchwork Parkway will take you on a drive you won’t soon forget.

Though the lake receives the most publicity from angling reports, magazine articles and television, there are many other quality waters nearby. There are multiple streams which border the lake and several others within a 20 minute drive. Our Panguitch Lake fly fishing guides will show you why many fly-fishers return to the area each year to experience this world class fishery.

Whether you are in search of dry fly fishing the streams or float tubing Panguitch Lake or one of several other local lakes, our experienced guides are up to the challenge.

The earliest known use of Panguitch Lake was as a fishery by Paiute Indians. In fact, the name Panguitch means “big fish” in the Paiute language. Panguitch Lake was treated with rotenone beginning May 1, 2006 to control the population of Utah chub, which were probably introduced accidentally by anglers using them as live bait. As this treatment removes all fish from the lake, it had to be restocked in May 25, 2006 with 20,000 rainbow trout. The lake has been treated three times since then.

Other Area Waters

Classic small stream waters fished with a dry fly are what give southern Utah its identity. Countless natural lakes and reservoirs will also entice those looking for peaceful and quiet places to bend a rod. Mammoth Creek has a prolific salmonfly hatch among others and Panguitch Creek won’t disappoint with an epic evening caddis.

Panguitch Lake has always been known to grow large trout. Rainbows as well as Bonneville cutthroat are being caught on flies in excess of 10 pounds. Float tubes and pontoon boats are perfectly suitable for fishing these waters, but come prepared for to anchor down in weather as this is a large lake. Fly fishing nearby Navajo Lake is also a wonderful experience. Tree lined emerald waters are home to sizeable rainbows and relatively easy fishing.

Fly fishing Bryce Canyon National Park areas are also great options. Tropic reservoir and its small stream tributaries offer quality water for fly fishers who will also appreciate awe inspiring scenery. Within a short drive of Bryce are the East Fork of the Sevier River, Antimony Creek, North Creek, the Boulder Mountains and many others.

Our Bryce Canyon area fly fishing guides are a must as many of these waters require local knowledge of private stretches and public waters.

Fremont River Guides are experienced professionals and will pick you up at your lodging facility for a day on the water. Flies, gear and lunch are all provided in a full day trip. Call to book your dates as the season is short and guides highly sought after.

Hiking these canyons can be dangerous! It is highly recommended to hire a guide knowledgeable about the trails and weather patterns. The scenery of these canyons and spring creeks inspire all who venture off the beaten path.

Call us for information about fishing private waters near Brian Head and Duck Creek Village with a guide only. There are some exclusive options which you don’t want to miss!

Fly Fishing Guide Trip Rates

Fishlake

_DSC0058cropresize500

Fishlake is a high alpine lake (elevation approximately 8,848 ft) located in the Fishlake/ Southern Wasatch Plateau region of south-central Utah and is what the Fishlake Mountains are named after. It lies within and is the namesake of the Fishlake National Forest.

The lake, five miles long by one and a half miles wide at its widest point, lies in a geologic structure known as a graben valley. It is bounded by the Mytoge Mountains on the south-east shore which rises sharply to over 1,000 feet above the lake level. Along the north-west shore the lake is bounded by Fish Lake Hightop Plateau (elev. ~11,600 ft). Based on recent research the lake has an average depth in summer of about 100 feet and has been found to be 127 feet deep in its deepest known location.

The lake is best known for its sport fishing—particularly its large lake trout (also known as mackinaw). Fish are caught every summer upwards of 25 lbs. The region sees heavy snowfall in the winter, with snowfall occurring as late as June in any given year. For this reason tourist activity is at its peak in the summer months.

Fly fishing this big lake can be rewarding from a boat as there are plentiful shallow shorelines which are productive with a fly. For the discriminating fly fisher, if you put your time on this lake or hire a guide, it will reward you with some big fish. Monster Brown and Splake (lake trout/brook trout hybrid) can be found in the fall if you look hard. Look for the big Mackinaw in the springtime.

Guide-Client Fish Jumps

Small Water, Big Fish

More importantly, the neighboring streams to the lake are Sevenmile Creek and UM Creek which downriver form the headwaters of the Fremont River. Sevenmile produces large quantities of Brook trout in the 6-10 inch range and UM supports a healthy population of re-introduced Colorado River Cutthroat from 6-16 inches. Tiger Trout can be found as well and some may reach or exceed 20 inches, but they are very wiley and hard fighting bruisers.

If you put in some time scouting out the area, you will find beavers in full force on this mountain. There are many beaver ponds worth fishing and none of which will produce a monster brook trout. They are fun to fish and a good trade-off to the summer heat and other anglers down the mountain.

Johnson Valley reservoir is formed about 8 miles from Fishlake by Sevenmile Creek and various springs. Then UM Creek and the Fremont River converge into Mill Meadow Reservoir. This stillwater holds much of the water which feeds the middle section of the Fremont River and eventually the lower river. Mill Meadow is home to Rainbows and nice Tiger Trout.

The upper Fremont River between Johnson Valley Reservoir and Mill Meadow Reservoir has some quality water, but due to the farmers using this water for irrigation, the summer months bring higher water and less fishability. Spring and fall are a better bet for the fly fisher as water is low and clear and perfect for dries or nymphing. Perhaps the best indicator of good fishing here is due to the season. As with most lakes, there are times when an angler can find bigger fish or more opportunities for success due to temperatures in the lake, fishing pressure and fish habits.